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Archive for the ‘Arts Education’ Category

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In 2018 I got to teach at the Sitka Fine Arts Camp Elementary School session. The camp groups students by age and rotates four sections of each age group through four different classes, in music, theater, visual art, and dance.

This year I had the 5th grade group, kids going into 6th grade, who came in for I think around 50 minutes each. Each group had around a dozen kids, and we had to set up, work, and clean up in that time before the next group came in. The camp was one week, so five mornings total.

The cleaning up is an important part of the process – young people actually like knowing what’s going on and they actually like cleaning up, especially sponging off the tables.

The first day I gave them watercolors, and had them try various techniques, with nice watercolor paints (they are Cotman travel sets, and over the years we have replaced the paint as it was used up with Daniel Smith watercolors) on 80# drawing paper. First we looked at some slides of the work of Helen Frankenthaler and Vasili Kandinsky, and told a little about those artists and periods.

Tuesday, we did observational drawing, of a wooden stool, doing fast draw, blind contour, then a longer drawing, then, if they had time, a smaller object of their choice. In this one I showed them basic drawing tricks, using angles, proportions, overlap, scale, and the trick of using the back ground, and the angles of the box the stool was on, to give their drawing depth.

Wednesday we drew the counselor, with the same drawing instruction, with the addition of learning to show the model respect.

Thursday we drew a still life of at least two objects, on the table near them. We didn’t do any warmups, but instead sketched on newsprint, then drew with pencil and outlined with pen or drew with a pen, then watercolor, on 80# drawing paper, using the various watercolor techniques from Monday.

On Friday, I set up lights and pushed the tables together, with the lights at one end, and kids sitting on the long sides of the tables. They did a quick draw then shaded (modeled) drawing of white styrofoam balls. Then, had them gather all their art, and put their favorite piece on top, and we did a little art walk, where each said something they liked about (someone else’s) picture.

One more thing was to have each kid at the end of each session put his or her work in a stack. I didn’t have any drying racks, so we arranged the stacks of pictures all around the edges of the room on the floor.

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Some Responses from the Faculty of the Sitka Fine Arts Camp, June 12, 2016

Before each camp, the faculty get together for orientation and introductions. In 2016, introductions extended to each of us telling why we teach. It made for a long meeting (!) but some beautiful expressions, and I took notes and am finally posting them here:

to give students an approach to learning

it is the act of giving in a genuine and meaningful way

to connect students to deeper reality

to give students tools for life

it is the act of recognition – of being recognized

empowering people

deep relationships

to counter capitalism

modeling strength for young Native people

collaboration – joyful

using skills and focus, the joy of creating

teaching allows me to question how and why I do my art

to teach problem solving

stretching by teacher and student

to learn empathy, confidence

the only way to make revolutionary, radical change

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gotham news 1957

Gotham News, 1955 by Willem de Kooning ( 69 x 79” Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo)

We looked at images of paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, Jackson Pollock, and Willem de Kooning, including pictures of the paintings in galleries, and Helen Frankenthaler and Jackson Pollock working in their studios, to show the very large scale of pictures in this school. I also told them where some of these pictures are, and had a snapshot of one (Small’s Paradise, by Helen Frankenthaler) I took in Washington D. C. in March.

I told them how Abstract Expressionism was painting that was not of something, but was the thing, in the words of Jackson Pollock. And how painting is a language, in which you can express things you can’t put into words.

The paintings they liked were both by de Kooning: Excavation and Gotham News, which is the one we talked about. The kids each noted something about the picture, and brought out the bright colors, and how it references people, dogs, layers, cities, noise, excitement, Batman, buildings and other structures, without being pictures of those things.

It could be too that they were drawn to this picture because it holds up better on the rather dim interactive white board projectors the school has. You don’t get the benefit of the brilliant colors of Helen Frankenthaler’s work. We held up the laptop so they could get an idea of the brilliance of the actual paintings.

Inspired by the picture, they made paintings in the manner of Abstract Expressionism. I think some of them felt like they were being naughty, by using a finger or their hands, in making layer on layer, in using gobs of paint, and even in scraping back to get to layers below. But they were not naughty, they were all fully involved in the paint and what it was doing. This was the most energetic and focused group I’ve had, as far as everyone diving in.

We asked them to mix at least 3 colors, and this time not to make a picture of a thing but to paint with colors and shapes and lines, and to try different brush sizes.

We even had time to clean up and to spend a few minutes looking at our work.

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matisse4

A Still Life by Henri Matisse

The very beautiful still-life paintings by Ms. Love’s Fifth Grade class in 2015. I’ve been meaning to put these up for a while. The students first learned about color mixing. They did these paintings in one session, painting from still lifes set up with colored cloths and fruit. They are done with tempera paint on canvas board (just because the teacher had some she wanted to get used!).img_2132smallimg_2133smallimg_2134smallimg_2135smallimg_2136smallimg_2137smallimg_2138smallimg_2139smallimg_2140smallimg_2141smallimg_2142smallimg_2143smallimg_2144smallimg_2145smallimg_2146smallimg_2147smallimg_2148smallimg_2149smallimg_2150smallimg_2151smallimg_2152small

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So yeah I paint and jigsaw sets – and the occasional piece of giant cutlery

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com/keyword/sitka%20fine%20arts%20camp/

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com/keyword/sitka%20fine%20arts%20camp/

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

Young Performers Theater Wizard of Oz. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

Young Performers Theater Peter Pan. Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

Young Performers Theater Peter Pan. Nice “log,” eh?  Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com

The Emerald City - 16 feet wide, Pete Weiland engineered sets with 8-foot-wide "pages" that turn.

The Emerald City – 16 feet wide, Pete Weiland engineered sets with 8-foot-wide “pages” that turn.

A "table" and a "barrel" for Young Performers Theater production of Peter Pan

A “table” and a “barrel” for Young Performers Theater production of Peter Pan

The house the Lost Boys built for Wendy

The house the Lost Boys built for Wendy

The Emerald City in the background, this one the foreground and the Emerald City is by Jennifer Carter

The Emerald City in the background, this one the foreground and the Emerald City is by Jennifer Carter

The Wicked Witch of the West home, also 16 feet across

The Wicked Witch of the West home, also 16 feet across

The gate for Oz, for Young Performers Theater

The gate for Oz, for Young Performers Theater

The Yellow Brick Road!

The Yellow Brick Road! Yellow bricks by Jennifer Carter

Wizard of Oz  Photo by Christine Davenport http://www.xtinepix.com/keyword/sitka%20fine%20arts%20camp/

Wizard of Oz

Broadway, these signs are lit from behind, thanks to the tech crew at the Sitka Performing Arts Center

Broadway, these signs are lit from behind, thanks to the tech crew at the Sitka Performing Arts Center

Nice silverware

Nice silverware

Beauty and the Beast: I only painted according to models the pillars and trees (trees on one side, columns on the other!)

Beauty and the Beast: I only painted according to models the pillars and trees (trees on one side, columns on the other!)

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At the 2015 Elementary-age Sitka Fine Arts Camp, I got to work with the 3rd through 5th graders. The first day we made abstract paintings, after looking at slides of paintings by Wasilly Kandinsky. Then we drew for two days, and the next, we painted their counselor modeling, or, if they wished, a figure, or anything they wanted.

Each group of 15 kids rotated through four classes:  music, theater, dance and visual art through the mornings during one week.

The only thing I asked on this one was that they mix three new colors for their picture.

Their work:

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The Sitka Fine Arts Camp has an elementary age session, one week of morning classes. Groups of 15 kids rotate through four classes of just under an hour. This year I got to do art with 3rd through 5th graders. One day we drew a chair – and on another, their counselor modeling!

Here is their work:

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