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Posts Tagged ‘wood engraving’

Cover 2018

The 2018 Outer Coast calendar is now available! Printed in glorious color on heavy, vellum-surface Natural colored paper by Alaska Litho in Juneau, Alaska U.S.A.

This calendar features my original art, poetry by Alaskans and other greats, gardening reminders for southeastern Alaska, and wilderness anniversaries. It opens out to 11 x 17 inches (8 1/2 by 11 closed), has a handy hole for hanging, and, has complete year of 2019 on the last page.

You can order on line from www.theoutercoast.com, buy in stores in Sitka, or, soon, buy in your favorite Alaskan or select Northwest bookstore. (If the store doesn’t have it, tell them to order thru distributor Taku Graphics.)

This year’s calendar is built around the theme of courage – having faith in what we know is good, and having a “frenzy for the future”: the faith it takes to work toward making the future even better than today.

Poetry includes a sonnet by Rainer Maria Rilke from his Sonnets to Orpheus, and some great quotes from Walt Whitman.

We have two beautiful poems by Caroline Goodwin from her latest book The Paper Tree, published this year (2017) by Big Yes Press.

And, a lovely haiku by Sitka’s own John Straley, from his recent book 100 Poems of Spring, published by Shorefast Editions in 2016.

Plus a couple of classics from poet Lew Welch (1926-1971). Here are some images of the 2018 calendar:

March 2018 image onlyApril 2018August 2018December 2018February 2018January 2019July 2018June2018May 2018October2018November 2018September 2018

 

 

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Raven in Snow

Raven in Snow

Muskeg in the Fall

Muskeg in the Fall

Bluebells in a Whiskey Bottle

Bluebells in a Whiskey Bottle

Spring Stars

Spring Stars

Poulson wood engraving Summer Sunset Troller

Poulson wood engraving Summer Sunset Troller

Poulson engraving Opheim Skiff

Poulson engraving Opheim Skiff

Kachemak Bay T-shirt Design

Kachemak Bay T-shirt Design

My pal Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock recently published a young adult novel, The Smell of Other People’s Houses. It’s good! She has a really nice touch, it’s super well done, and gets some of that flavor of growing up in Alaska in the 1970s and 80s, which might be kind of like growing up in a lot of rural places in that era. It’s authentic without trying too hard. I read a lot of young adult novels, reading to my kids at night, and skimming things my kids bring home, and this is the cream. It’s a good book by any standard, a real gem.

Anyway her publisher, Random House/Penguin/Dell commissioned me to make pictures for the “part titles” for the four sections of the book, and a picture for the title page.

This was last summer, and the Kachemak Bay Wooden Boat Society commissioned me to make a t-shirt design for the Wooden Boat Festival, for which I did a wood engraving of an Opheim Skiff.

All these wood engravings are available as prints, hand-printed from the block on a vintage 1929 hand-cranked proofing press.

They are all cut from 3″ x 4″ blocks, some of them, like the flowers and the skiff, on the diagonal.

They are $30 each, and can be ordered thru my website www.theoutercoast.com, or send me a message thru this blog, or FaceBook (Rebecca Poulson).

 

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It’s here! You can buy on line, or from stores in Alaska and beyond, in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho! Cover 2015

More about the calendar, as well as original prints and notecards, the order form and more are at my website The Outer Coast (theoutercoast.com).

I’ve published the calendar since 1995, and in full color since 2008.

I am very proud of it being printed in the United States, in fact in Juneau, Alaska, at the employee-owned Alaska Litho.

Here is a slide show of the other images in the calendar. The poetry and quotes are by Alaskan poets Caroline Goodwin, John Straley, Pete Weiland, young poet Anja Brooks-Schmidt, with classic lines from Ralph Waldo Emerson, Edward Lear, William Wordsworth, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Walt Whitman, on a theme of being in the moment.

I think it’s the best yet, but I always think that. Enjoy.

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I have been publishing this calendar, The Outer Coast, for a while now, and I think this is the best yet.

You can see it all at www.theoutercoast.com.

I started out inspired by the Cat Lovers Against the Bomb calendar. It was all black and white. My first calendar was for Christmas gifts in 1993,  made on the copier at the office supply store. I used wood engravings by my brother as well as my own. The text was the lyrics to Stardust:

And now the purple dusk of twilight time
Steals across the meadows of my heart . . .

For a long time I had the calendar printed in black and white, then full color. We can’t do full color here in Sitka, so I went to Juneau, to Alaska Litho, and had several pages in color for 2007.  It’s a lot more expensive, but there’s no going back – I love it.

It’s also cheaper to get color printing done “off shore” as they say, in Korea or China, but I grew up in a print shop, and like to keep it local.

The theme this year is Ecstatic Connection to Nature.

It started out with learning more about Ed Ricketts, a marine biologist and great thinker, the model for Steinbeck’s character Doc in Cannery Row. He and Sitkan Jack Calvin wrote Between Pacific Tides, published in 1939, one of the first handbooks to group animals by habitat rather than taxonomically (all worms together; all mollusks together; etc.). He was arguably a founder of ecological thinking – he called it Nonteleological Thinking – where instead of looking at creation as a sort of pyramid with Man at the top, we look at the world as being organized and existing for its own sake, and we are merely participants. Great stuff.

I wanted some good quotes, but searched in vain: Ricketts is not quotable.  But, my friend Caroline Goodwin had written some beautiful poems, and got me to look again at Gerard Manley Hopkins, who was ecstatic. He finally dropped poetry to become a Catholic monk.

The art is all wood engravings and watercolor sketches by me.  I did two new wood engravings this year, a waterfall and devil’s club. The watercolors are mainly done while at Forest Service cabins or hikes.

You can buy it at independent bookstores in Alaska, as well as Powells in Portland and Elliot Bay Books in Seattle (stores are listed on my website), or directly from my website (www.theoutercoast.com).

On the website I have special quantity deals.  So you can get a bunch of calendars at a very reasonable price, and give them to everyone you love, as well as acquaintances, your mailman, babysitter, etc. The gift that gives all year. And beyond, since there is a calendar for 2014 on the last page.

And – anniversaries of things like the Prinsendam and botanists’ birthdays; gardening reminders (from an actual gardener, Kitty LaBounty); and moon phases for the Alaskan time zone.

Thank you.

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This was a neat project, and the inspiration for starting a blog – to share successful art projects for children.

Megan Lindeman taught drawing and painting at the 2011 Sitka Fine Arts Camp, which has a week for grade school children, then two-week residential sessions for middle school then high school students.

This project was for kids going into fourth grade up to going into sixth grade.

She had each child choose a dictionary illustration – tiny wood engravings from John Carrera’s A Pictorial Webster’s (which itself is really cool). ( Here is a link to a video he made of this remarkable production.)

Megan had each student choose an engraving of an animal, and cut it out from the photocopy sheet. Next, they toned a piece of white paper (big – 18 x 24) with vine charcoal. Then, they used the vine charcoal to draw a large version of their animal, trying to use the entire paper.

Then they were to fill in the middle tones in the picture using the vine charcoal. They then used Alphacolor Char-Kole (compressed charcoal – super black) to add the darkest tones to the picture. Then they used the eraser to get highlights, and finally used white drawing pencils for the brightest highlights.

But that’s not all! They then used chalk pastels to make vibrant, abstract backgrounds for their animals, and the final touch was collaging scraps of colored – and metallic – papers onto the background.

Megan’s original inspiration was an artist in Europe who makes beautiful drawings, then pastes them up into the urban environment, and allows the graffiti and advertisements and grit and posters to happen to his art, and complete it. She had intended to have the kids spray water on the drawings, but they looked so cool the way they were, plus the paper was not very strong.

The classes were about 50 minutes, for five days. This project took three sessions, then day four she had the kids draw an imaginary bicycle – and the last day, they did a quick acrylic still life. I believe the great art teachers always push the limits – so we had a lot of hair dryers going that last day. And of course it wouldn’t be arts camp without blowing a fuse.

The brilliance of this project was that the kids were led through drawing from observation, and modelling with charcoal, without knowing it. I knew a lot of the kids, and a project that engages not only the Artists but the Jocks, that’s a project. They all learned a lot, and were pleased with what they made.

This project would work well for kids all the way through high school.

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